Displaying episodes 31 - 60 of 132 in total

Bonus: Why does my bread taste like a banana? (and other questions)

In this month's bonus episode, Melissa and Jam respond to comments and questions about salt, bread that tastes like bananas, sunscreen on fences, AND improvements to our chemistry analogies!

Why do cornstarch and water do that thing?

It's one of life's most head-scratchy questions, and one of the most popular chemistry mysteries for youtubers. So let's get to the bottom of this crazy, shape-shifting substance, and finally find out why cornstarch and water do that thing!

What is iodized salt? And why?

Who's doing what to our salt? What's iodine, do we need it, why, and how do they get it in there? This week Melissa and Jam dive head first into figurative iodized salt dunes. Let's take a closer look at the chemistry of something so everyday, we hardly even think about it.

How do fireworks use chemistry to look awesome?

Happy New Years Eve! Let's all kiss 2020 a speedy (not speedy enough) goodbye and look at some beautiful exploding lights! And why not look at the chemistry in these things as well. How do fireworks work? How do they get up into the air? And most importantly, how do they explode in different colors and patterns? Let's find out! And thanks for being one of the great things about 2020, we love you guys!

Chemistry at Home: Diapers

Here's another bonus episode dedicated to teaching a specific chemistry experiment you can do at home. This month, we see what happens when we experiment with diapers, and the mysterious dust within them.

What are LEDs and how do they light up?

Happy holidays, we hope you have a wonderful season whatever you celebrate! We've got a holiday related episode for you: LEDs. Well I guess we use them all year round, but they get an extra spotlight this time of year. What are they? How do they work? How are they different from other lights? Let's find out!

Bonus: Enzymes eat plastic? (and other questions)

In this month's bonus episode, Melissa and Jam respond to comments and questions about enzymes that eat plastic, super glue on difference surfaces, diaper polymers, bleached celery, holiday movies, and more!

How do we see our breath in the air?

This time of year, it's a common occurrence, something so common that we might not even wonder about it anymore. But really, why do we see our breath in the air when it's cold? We see steam from cooking things and boiling water, but our breath isn't that hot, so why do we see it? What does temperature have to do with it? Let's find out.

What is silver tarnish?

Well if you haven't experienced silver tarnish yourself, then you've almost certainly heard people complain about it. Can anything last? These sparkly treasures we collect and cherish, are they but temporary sparkles, doomed to a fate of tarnish? Or is there a way out? Also what is tarnish? Thankfully in this case, these philosophical questions actually have a chemistry explanation. So let's get into it.

How do odor absorbers work?

You know what they say, everyone's experienced odors, and 99.99% of all odors smell. We have room sprays, candles, air fresheners, etc. But how can we absorb or eliminate bad smells? Can chemistry do it? How? Let's find out!

Chemistry at Home: Leaf Pigments

Here's another bonus episode dedicated to teaching a specific chemistry experiment you can do at home. This month, we see what happens when we cut up different colors of leaves, put them in alcohol, mash them up, and soak a coffee filter in them.

What happens to eggs when we cook them? (with Jason Cress)

It's time to crack into one of life's great mysteries: eggs. So what happens when we cook them?! How do they go from clear goo to white jiggle? This is a question we received long ago, and with topics this serious, we don't yoke around. So we waiting until we could bring in an eggsperienced egg chef, Jason Cress, to figure out this topic with us. In Jam's opinion, Jason's insight on the topic of eggs just can't be beat. We know many of you guys may be busy with some (hopefully safe) version of Thanksgiving, but despite the holiday we couldn't pass on the chance to shell out another episode for you guys, especially for our friends around the world, who are just experiencing a regular ol' Thursday today. Well without further ado, let's ap-poach this mystery together.

Bonus: Can equilibrium occur in any state of matter? (and other questions)

In this month's bonus episode, Melissa and Jam respond to comments and questions about equilibrium, recycling on a large scale, why leaves fall off, sound effects, and Avatar: The Last Airbender.

How do diapers absorb liquid?

Ok parents. It's time to explore the chemistry of something we rely on every hour of every day: diapers. What the heck is going on inside there? How do they absorb SO much? Is it magic? Well, settle in and get ready to soak up some chemistry, let's get to the bottom of this mystery. Let's hope it doesn't get messy.

How is nail polish chemistry?

There's this stuff, you've probably heard of it, that you can put on 10-20 specific places on your body, and it stays there, and it can be different colors. That's right, it's nail polish! What is nail polish? It sticks, but it's obviously not just glue right? It's colorful, but it's clearly not just paint right? What chemistry is going on in nail polish? How is it strong and long lasting? How does it dry so quickly? So many questions, let's get into it! PS. Some of you fellas may be thinking this won't interest you, but we'll bet the chemistry is more interesting than you'd expect!

Is science always right?

This week we issue a correction, joining other science publications issuing the same correction. That's kind of an obvious answer to the question of "Is science always right?" So in this episode we explore that question, as well as what happens when science isn't right. And why that's NOT a bad thing.

How do glowsticks glow?

Guess what time of year it is. It's spooky time! One thing we see a lot of during this time of year, is things that glow. And you better believe that's chemistry. So how do glowsticks glow? How does bending the glowsticks start that process? What's mixing with what, and seriously how the heck does it glow? Let's find out.

Chemistry at Home: Cabbage Juice

Here's another bonus episode dedicated to teaching a specific chemistry experiment you can do at home. This month, we see what happens when we blend up red cabbage and water, and mix it with six different substances.

What IS lavender oil?

This week we take a teeny tiny step into the vast, intimidating sea of essential oils. Not to worry, we're sticking to the chemistry. And we're exploring one of the smelliest, purply-est ones. Firstly, what is lavender oil? And how do we get it out of the lavender plant? And what does it do? And can I put it on my meatball sub?

Bonus: How do you remove superglue from your fingers? (and other questions)

In this month's bonus episode, Melissa and Jam respond to comments and questions about buying renewable items, missed puns, polymers, spilling hot water, superglue, the future of the podcast, and much more!

Why do leaves change color in the fall?

It's Fall! You know why they call Fall Fall? Well because the leaves fall. But before that, the leaves change color. Why do they do that? How? Is there any sort of function to it? Do the different colors mean anything? Let's dive into this overdue, colorful topic.

What's the future of recycling?

Part 3 of 3 on plastic! This week we look to the future. Is there hope to overcome our piles of plastic? What new ways of recycling are coming down the pike? What are those sneaky chemists up to? Can we make better kinds of plastic, or better ways to reuse it? Let's find out. And let's try to stay positive.

Is plastic really recyclable?

This is part 2 of 3 on plastic, so check out last week's episode if you haven't yet! This week, Melissa and Jam dive into one of the weightiest questions of our day. Is plastic even really recyclable? If so, how is it done? Is it really better than just making new plastic? Is it worth all the trouble of rinsing and sorting our recycling? Is recycling effective enough to lead us toward a cleaner future? Let's try our best to find out.

Chemistry at Home: Slime

Here's another bonus episode dedicated to teaching a specific chemistry experiment you can do at home. This month, we see what happens when we combine glue, water, and borax!

What is plastic?

Think about it for a second, plastic is everywhere. What plastic things are around you right now? What plastic things do you use everyday? This week, Melissa and Jam dive right into the proverbial (and sort of literal) ball pit. What even is plastic? What is it made of? How is it made? How are there so many different kinds? Let's find out.

Bonus: Why doesn’t superglue harden in the tube? (and other questions)

In this month's bonus episode, Melissa and Jam respond to comments and questions about gasoline, super glue, smells, books, and a continuation of last month's movie discussion!

How does super glue glue things?

Be honest. Have you ever glued yourself with super glue? Everyone should accidentally make that mistake at least once, so you can literally feel the impressive stickiness of super glue. Well today, you can learn about the chemistry within super glue, without putting any fingers or other body parts at risk! Let's do this.

Why do we use fluoride on our teeth?

Chances are you've heard the word "fluoride" said in reference to your teeth. At the dentists office, on your bottle of mouthwash, maybe you've heard it's in tap water? But what is it, what's so special about it, and how does it help our teeth? Does it make them whiter, stronger, or what? Let's find out.

How does caffeine make you not sleepy?

Ok so, caffeine. Some of us live on the stuff, and others of us want nothing to do with it. There's a lot of things caffeine can do to our bodies, but of course the number one question, is how does it keep the sleepiness away? Let's get into it. And we may find out a few other things caffeine does along the way.

Chemistry at Home: Density

Here's another bonus episode dedicated to teaching a specific chemistry experiment you can do at home. This month, we see what happens when we combine honey, corn syrup, dish soap, water, oil, and alcohol.

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